Look Familiar? Five Famous Homes That Hit the Market This Year

Ever wonder where a movie was shot? Or where you can find the house that was used in that opening scene of your favorite television show? Well here is the scoop on five iconic movie and TV homes that were put up for sale within the past year. Let us know if you’re surprised by the size of any of their price tags by commenting below!

1. “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”

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If you were looking to scoop up a piece of pop culture history, you just missed out on this one. This home was made famous by the 1986 “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” film just sold for $1.06 million. If you’re a fan of the movie, you’ll recognize the garage in the listing photos; it was where the infamous Ferrari was stored at Cameron’s house. The four-bedroom, four-bathroom home was designed by A. James Speyer and spans 4,300 square feet.

2. “Scarface”

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For $35 million, you can be the new owner of the infamous mansion where (spoiler alert!) Tony Montana fell to his death in a blaze of glory and gunfire. The 9,816-square-foot-home has four bedrooms and nine bathrooms, and sits on 10 acres in Montecito, California. Several reflecting pools are scattered throughout the property, including the one shown in the scene where Montana met his demise. According to the listing details, the enormous estate was designed by renowned architect Bertram Goodhue. It was built in 1906, and has been carefully restored with an eye for detail. As Montana would say, “every day above ground is a good day,” especially in a beautiful mansion like this.

3. “American Horror Story”

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You might not want to be left home alone in this house, which is actually known as the “Murder House” from the first season of the FX series “American Horror Story.” According to the listing details, the 7,588-square-foot Rosenheim estate is a landmark property. The Los Angeles home has been used as the shoot location for a plethora of other productions, including “Old Blue Eyes” starring Frank Sinatra, “Grey’s Anatomy,” and 2002’s “Spiderman.” For $5 million, this frightening mansion can be all yours. Hauntings sold separately.

4. “Modern Family”

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“Modern Family” fanatics will recognize this property as the Dunphy household, but it was actually only used for the exterior shots of the family’s home; the rest of the scenes are shot inside a studio. The four-bedroom, 4.5-bathroom home hit the market on March 11 for $2.35 million and sold May 16 for $2.15 million. The Dunphys may need to “relocate” next season if the home’s new owners aren’t interested in sharing their Los Angeles property with the hit television show.

5. “Keeping Up with the Kardashians”

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If you are trying to keep up with the Kardashians, you definitely know this home.  It was featured as the Kardashian house for the latest season of “Keeping Up with the Kardashians,” but the K family didn’t really live in the seven-bedroom, eight-bathroom Los Angeles estate. This property was just used for the show’s exterior shots. The estate is currently on the market, so if you are interested in looking like you are keeping up, it will cost you $6.25 million.

 Surprise, one more!

6. “Full House”

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This home hasn’t actually been on the market for years (how rude!), but how could we end a roundup of famous homes without bringing this one into the mix? It’s the home that needs no introduction for those of you who grew up in the ’80s or ’90s; it was used for exterior shots of the Tanner home for “Full House.” Even if you have never seen this house in person, the picture alone is enough to bring back a flood of childhood memories for anyone who grew up on Danny Tanner’s life lessons. While the three-bedroom, three-bathroom property no longer has the signature red door, it is still recognizable to tried and true fans. The actual owners probably don’t appreciate the fanfare the home generates, but they still get to be a part of some serious television history! According to the listing, the San Francisco home last sold for $1.85 million in 2006.

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